This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

EPA Formaldehyde Rule Effective Date Extended

EPA Formaldehyde Rule Effective Date Extended

The effective date of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) formaldehyde rule has been delayed until May 22, 2017.  The original date of implementation was to be March 21st.  The rule, along with four other “Obama-era” regulations, has been delayed pursuant to the January 20th regulatory freeze memorandum that was issued by the Trump administration to temporarily postpone the effective dates of these regulations.  According to the Federal Register, “The further temporary delay in effective date until May 22, 2017, is necessary to give Agency officials the opportunity to decide whether they would like to conduct a substantive review of the five regulations….”

The Formaldehyde Emission Standards for Composite Wood Products Act of 2010 established emission standards for formaldehyde from composite wood products and directed EPA to finalize a rule on implementing and enforcing a number of provisions covering composite wood products.  The EPA Formaldehyde rule was subsequently published in the Federal Register on December 12, 2016 to reduce exposure to formaldehyde emissions from certain composite wood products produced domestically or imported into the United States.  EPA worked with the California Air Resources Board (CARB) to help ensure the final national rule was consistent with California’s requirements for composite wood products, which incorporates enforcement provisions that include requirements for chain of custody documentation and emissions testing.

Sources: ChemicalWatch; Federal Register; EPA; CA Air Resources Board

2017-03-28T20:36:52+00:00 March 28th, 2017|Codes & Standards News|